The Cultural Injustice of Death on Demand


The disregard for human life in this day and age is breath-taking. It seems that a generation has come that feels there’s honor in controlling the circumstances of death and power in controlling the death of others. I’m referring to the increasing rise and acceptance of euthanasia, which is the younger sister of the much more mature practice of abortion. The culture has embraced death on demand.

Euthanasia and abortion doctors are a special kind of parasites, profiting from taking life from the most vulnerable in society at their most desperate point in life. And it seems that they get to make the decisions about who lives and dies with no third-party, disinterested decision-maker involved. Consider that in Tennessee, from 2000 until now, there has been no requirement for a doctor to provide for informed consent from women seeking abortions. No explanation necessary, according to the law. According to this article in the New Yorker, in Belgium, a death doc carried out euthanasia with no contact made to living family members, and no apparent opinion gained outside of his impression of his victim.

Europe has been the cultural hotbed of such liberal, humanistic, “enlightened” policies, under the guise of “the patient knows best,” and, “Who am I to decide for another person, how they should live or die?” Thus, there it is simply a matter of choice. Like abortion here in the US. One option among many. But which option do the death docs profit from? Which option are they most likely to promote?

It has just gotten to the point where anything resembling authority outside of self is completely rejected. And power over death is the ultimate self-empowerment. Too bad that it is a power reserved for God alone, the One whose Lordship is most spurned today. But is it really self-empowerment when there is such potential for deception and coercion from someone who is going to profit from your death? Is it really autonomy if the options for happiness and fulfillment apart from dying are covered up?

Sympathizing with the desire to die, while understandable as a human emotion, really should have no place in making medical and psychiatric decisions. On that note, as a mental health professional, playing into one’s desire to die is cruel and antithetical to the purpose of improving mental health. Life-long depression as a reason for euthanasia? The potential for psychiatric distress due to having a baby as a reason for abortion?

We have to live our lives and speak truth in such a way that others want to take part in what we have and to understand what makes us who we are.

In decades past, I would feel safe saying that a majority of people in the US would think these sentiments are ludicrous, but today, I’m not so sure. There is some comfort in knowing that, according to Gallup, 51% of Americans feel that abortion should only be legal in certain circumstances, and of that number, 36% believe it should be legal only in few circumstances. While only 19% believe abortion should be illegal in all circumstances, 44% of the sample asked considers themselves pro-life.

It is pitiful that we even need to measure such statistics, but the reason we do is because death on demand was accepted by the culture, then the government, long ago. I hope we never get to the point where these questions have to be asked about euthanasia, the way we have to ask them about abortion. If we the people aren’t careful, we will let the culture get away from us again. Merchants of death, by reason of the lies they tell, somehow are able to turn their consumers into the biggest cheerleaders for the goods they sell.

So we have to live our lives and speak truth in such a way that others want to take part in what we have and to understand what makes us who we are. We pro-life folks haven’t escaped tragedy and hardship our entire lives, but we have understood through suffering that life is worth living and worth fighting for. Can we pass that on to someone else today?

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